‘Read by Grade Three’ law helps students

This column originally appeared in the Traverse City Record Eagle.

The most important educational tool for building a child’s future success is the ability to read.

Reading is a big predictor of success in school, work and life. Reading proficiently by the end of third grade is essential for future learning. By fourth grade, there is a shift in focus from “learning to read” to “reading to learn,” meaning those who are behind their classmates will fall further and further behind.

In 2016, Lansing passed a comprehensive “Read by Grade Three” law that goes into full effect this school year — with the goal of all students reading at grade level by the end of third grade. The law ensures early identification of students struggling and establishes intensive reading support for those who need more help.

It’s hard to understand why some in the education community complain about the law. Leaders in Lansing need to stand firm and keep this critical assistance for students who struggle.

Students who aren’t proficient in reading by the end of third grade are four times more likely to not graduate high school. African-American and Hispanic students not reading in third grade are six times more likely to drop out or fail to graduate, according to the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

When students can’t read, problems don’t end in the classroom. According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy, 7 out of 10 inmates in U.S. prisons cannot read above a fourth grade level.

It’s understandable why policymakers identified reading as a priority for Michigan’s students.

Thankfully, Michigan’s public schools and public charter schools have talented and dedicated teachers who take their students’ success seriously and personally.

The third-grade reading law supports teachers by ensuring students get help as early as kindergarten. Under the law, schools identify students who struggle to read and then deliver individualized support and resources to help them catch up, including reading improvement plans, literacy coaches, intervention programs and more.

At the end of third grade, students unable to demonstrate sufficient reading skills for promotion are retained and provided with more specialized support and time to catch up and enter fourth grade ready to “read to learn.”

“Retention” can be a challenging concept, but for students who face it, it may be a lifeline. Experts say retained students can catch up while students who are promoted without the instruction they need fall further behind. Minority students benefit the most.

A review conducted in 2017 found that students retained under this type of policy graduate with a higher GPA and take fewer remediation courses in high school. They outperform their peers who just met the cut score for promotion in reading and math, and they have a higher probability of graduating with a regular diploma.

Our state’s public schools — traditional and charter — spent the last three years preparing for the third grade reading law’s full implementation, focused on delivering results that help Michigan kids read.

They believe every student in Michigan matters. They’re right. That’s why we support the third-grade reading law.


About the author: Beth DeShone is the executive director of the Great Lakes Education Project, a bi-partisan, nonprofit advocacy organization supporting quality choices in public education for Michigan students. GLEP supports efforts to improve academic achievement, increase accountability and empower parental choice.

Promote 529s that Cover K-12 Education, Invest in Michigan Schools

The summer is now squarely in the rearview mirror and schools everywhere are back in session.  For parents, it can be a relief getting the kids back to class – and getting all of those back-to-school preparations knocked off the to-do list.  We’re eager to see our children learn, to grow, and to succeed.

That’s why we buy the school supplies, sign up for the PTA meetings, and help them with their homework.  It’s also why a parent is never done preparing for their children’s future.
 
September is College Savings Month, and state officials are holding events highlighting 529 plans – a great resource that can help parents plan for their kids’ future learning while gaining a tax break.  Keep reading to learn how 529s aren’t only for higher education anymore, and why we’re asking you to learn more about how they can help parents fund kids’ K-12 schooling, too!
/campaigns/sitesapi/files/images/648799522/BethDeShoneSignature_sm.pngBeth DeShone
Executive Director, Great Lakes Education Project
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“Gabriela Chulevski, K-2 principal at Detroit Academy of Arts and Sciences, says it’s especially helpful to collaborate with other charters that face similar issues, such as chronic absenteeism.
 
“How are you overcoming students who might have been absent for a week?” she said, describing the questions she’d like to ask other school leaders in the city. “What plan do you have to make sure that they’re successful when they come back? Just having a thought partner to think things through, so that you’re not alone, is so important.”
 
“Clearly, our Education Freedom Scholarships proposal is the solution American families want,” said Ms. DeVos in a statement. “This common-sense approach puts students and parents in control, without taking a single cent from public schools or teachers.”
 
“MESP is Michigan’s direct-sold Section 529 college savings plan, which offers Michigan taxpayers a Michigan income tax deduction on contributions and potential tax-free growth on any earnings if account proceeds are used to pay for qualified higher education expenses.”
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529 Plans Help Families Pay for College – And Pay for K-12, Too

Here in Michigan, residents can contribute to something called a “529 plan” (named after Section 529 of the IRS code) to help invest and prepay for their kids’ (or relatives’) college education. The plan is what the experts call “a tax-advantaged savings and investment system designed to encourage saving for the future expenses of a designated beneficiary” – your child, grandchild, or loved one.  In other words, when you make a contribution, you get a tax deduction, and account earnings are often tax-free.

Prepaid Tuition plans allow parents to pre-purchase tuition at a college or university at today’s rates, saving big bucks as tuition increases between the purchase date and a student’s eventual enrollment.
 
Savings Plans allow beneficiaries to see their investment grow as the result of market performance and the state’s best-intentioned investments in things like mutual funds.
 
Federal law now allows the plans to be used for K-12 educational expenses, as well.  
 
That’s great news!
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If your family, or anyone you know, would like more information on the federal tax changes to 529 plans and how to take advantage of the new K-12 opportunities, just click here.
If you are currently using a 529 plan for K-12 education expenses we would love to hear your story! Please email your name and a few details to bdeshone@glep.org.


State Dept. of Ed Brags: ‘We’re Breaking the Law!’

New teachers, exciting classrooms, fresh school supplies.  Students across Michigan have already begun heading back to school!  It’s an exciting time of year for students, teachers and parents.

Unfortunately, parents who’ve been counting on action this summer from the Michigan Department of Education and the state Board of Education on issues like public school transparency, funding, and other important issues are left wanting more.
 
The Department of Education might not think report cards are important, but we do.  So before you pack your next lunch or load your next backpack, read on for our own Michigan state education official summer report card.
/campaigns/sitesapi/files/images/648799522/BethDeShoneSignature_sm.pngBeth DeShone
Executive Director, Great Lakes Education Project
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Michigan Radio:State education officials won’t have “A to F” grades for schools ready by Sept. 1st

“The Michigan Department of Education is getting an “incomplete” on its assignment to assign a letter grade to every Michigan school. The state Department of Education will miss a September first deadline to provide “A to F” grades on Michigan schools.”
 
“In Michigan’s public schools, salaries are not based on a teacher’s effectiveness. In virtually every conventional public school district, teachers unions negotiate salaries based on two components — college credits acquired and years of seniority.”
 
“Michigan’s Read by Third Grade law, approved in 2016, requires schools to identify students struggling to read through school-issued tests, then give those students individual reading improvement plans, access to early literacy coaches and a reading intervention program, among other resources.”
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The Summer Report Card: Transparency, Funding, Performance

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The state’s Chief Deputy Superintendent of public education this week told the state Board of Education that the Michigan Department of Education plans to break state law, refusing to meet a binding September 1 legal deadline to release A-F letter grades for Michigan’s schools.
The Department of Education’s intentional and brazen decision to break the law and hide school performance data from taxpayers is an attack on students, an attack on parents, and an attack on the rule of law. When everyday Michiganders break the law, there are consequences, and bureaucrats who break the law to hide records from the public must face consequences as well.
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In an appalling attack on Michigan teachers and their students at the beginning of the summer, the State Board of Education attempted to block a $47-plus million federal grant for Michigan public charter schools designed to provide new text books, classroom equipment and supplies, curriculum materials, and program design for Michigan public schools.
The grant, designed to pump $14 million worth of supplies, books, and programming into Michigan public charter school classrooms for the first school year alone, was part of an Obama-era grant under the Every Student Succeeds Act.  Despite the Board’s attempt to withhold federal funds from at-risk kids, the Department of Education worked around them and delivered the funds to Michigan classrooms.
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This year, the state’s 3rd grade reading law kicks into high gear, requiring districts to identify students who cannot read proficiently by the 3rd grade and provide them with the extra help and supports they need to move to grade level – or risk being held back.  The summer has been spent by some in the education community complaining about the law and the difficulty of helping kids read.  The law has been on the books since 2016.  We’ll learn in the months to come how it is implemented. 
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Contact the state Board of Education today and ask them to hold the Education Department accountable for refusing to comply with state law on critical school transparency measures.


New State Superintendent Takes Job, Up to 3 Off-Days Per Week

At GLEP, we are fighting to give students innovative options in the classroom, our great public school teachers the resources they need, and voters the accountability from state policymakers they deserve.

To that end, we hope you’ll join us raising the alarm as the state Department of Education welcomes a new Superintendent – Michael Rice – with a contract granting him up to 3 paid days off per week between now and the end of the year.
 
We’re holding the Department accountable to deliver A-F grades for Michigan schools to every parent in the state, as well. Students head back to school in just a few weeks.  We’re committed to ensuring Lansing delivers them the best possible education.
/campaigns/sitesapi/files/images/648799522/BethDeShoneSignature_sm.pngBeth DeShone
Executive Director, Great Lakes Education Project
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“The Michigan Department of Education may choose to create confusion because the federal plan requires some different information, but there is no reason that should stop them from providing that information in a more transparent fashion for parents.”
 
“Our students bring home report cards each year so parents can monitor their progress. Families deserve the same level of transparency and accountability from their children’s schools.”
 
“People tend not to think about back-to-school shopping as an event like Christmas or Black Friday, but it is by far bigger than the winter holidays,” Mark Mathews, vice president of research development and industry analysis for the National Retail Federation, told MLive in an interview.”
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State Board Gives Incoming Superintendent 66 Paid Days Off in 2019, Almost 6 Times Number Given Most Public School Teachers

Michael Rice last week became the state’s new Superintendent of public education, and the state Board of Education welcomed him with a gold-plated pay and benefits package big enough that if invested differently, could hire six (6!) new public school teachers.

 
Most outrageous?  The $216,000 annual contract offered by State Board of Education Chair Casandra Ulbrich immediately gives Mr. Rice 36 days of sick leave and 30 days of vacation time.  Under the contract, Rice could work as few as 2 days per week between August 1st – his first day on the job – and the end of the year.
 
According to an analysis by the Thomas Fordham Institute, teachers get on average about 12 combined sick and personal days per year, less than one-fifth the amount given Rice before he spends a single hour on the job.
 
Michael Rice’s gold-plated pay and benefits package is a slap in the face to public school teachers and students across the state, and he should give it back. 
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Michigan parents are expected to spend nearly $700 over the next month as they prepare their students to head back to school.  Parents invest in our schools and they invest in our teachers, because they deserve it.
 
Rice’s contract tells teachers and administrators where the State Board of Education’s priorities really lie – and that from the start they have no real plan to hold the Superintendent accountable. (It’d be hard to hold any employee accountable when you give him 3 paid off-days per week.)
 
The state could hire 6 new teachers, complete with benefits for what the Board of Education is spending to butter up the next Superintendent.  The Board is unprepared and ill-equipped to do the right thing, but Michael Rice still has that opportunity.  Rice can prove to teachers they really matter to him by refusing the Board’s plan to make him rich on the backs of Michigan students.
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Contact the state Board of Education today and ask them to reverse course on the Superintendent’s outrageous, gold-plated benefits package.
You go out of your way to fully invest in your child’s education. The Board should not divert hundreds of thousands of dollars to pay an employee it only expects to work 2 days per week.


Incoming Superintendent Michael Rice Should Refuse, Return Gold-Plated Benefits Package

GLEP: Incoming Superintendent Michael Rice Should Refuse, Return Gold-Plated Benefits Package

State Board Offers Rice 66 Paid Days Off in 2019, More than 5 Times Number Given Most Public School Teachers

LANSING—Great Lakes Education Project Executive Director Beth DeShone today demanded incoming state Superintendent Michael Rice refuse a gold-plated benefits package offered by the state Board of Education that is set to give him more than 5 times the amount of paid vacation time and sick leave as the average public school teacher, and 6 times the pay, all before he has worked a single day on the job.

Rice’s contract, offered by State Board of Education Chair Casandra Ulbrich, immediately gives him 36 days of sick leave and 30 days of vacation time.  Rice’s contract details were first reported by MIRS.[1]

Under the contract, Rice could work as few as 2 days per week between August 1st – his first day on the job – and the end of the year.

According to an analysis by the Thomas Fordham Institute, teachers get on average about 12 combined sick and personal days per year[2], less than one-fifth the amount given Rice before he spends a single hour on the job.

Rice will also be paid $216,000 per year, more than any other state Department Director, and 6 times as much as the average first-year public school teacher in the state.

“Michael Rice’s gold-plated pay and benefits package is a slap in the face to public school teachers and students across the state, and he should give it back,” said Beth DeShone, Executive Director of the Great Lakes Education Project.  “The state could hire 6 new teachers, complete with benefits for what the Board of Education is spending to butter up the next Superintendent.  The Board is unprepared and ill-equipped to do the right thing, but Michael Rice still has that opportunity.  Rice can prove to teachers they really matter to him by refusing the Board’s plan to make him rich on the backs of Michigan students.”

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Welcome to ChangeEd

Welcome to changeEd, the new regular newsletter of the Great Lakes Education Project. At GLEP, we are laser focused on delivering results for Michigan students. That means innovating at the state Capitol and in school districts across Michigan to boost student performance, innovate in the classroom to meet the unique needs of our kids, in addition to supporting great local public charter schools and the certified public school teachers who innovate every day to support Michigan’s kids.

/campaigns/sitesapi/files/images/648799522/BethDeShoneSignature_sm.pngBeth DeShone
Executive Director, Great Lakes Education Project
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“Regardless of how much more we spend on top of the nearly $15 billion we already do, my advice is to stop funding systems and begin funding children. Directly.”
 
“A closer look suggests that Hecker’s example illustrates why public charter schools are needed in the city with the nation’s worst urban school district.”
 
“Overall, teachers in Michigan are well paid.The state’s average teacher salary, which was adjusted to the cost of living, is the ninth highest in the country.”
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Foot Dragging at Michigan Department of Education Means Parents May Not See Report Cards
 
Last winter, the legislature approved an innovative reform that would empower students, parents and teachers by giving every public school in the state letter grades – A, B, C, D or F – in five key areas. The grades are to be based around student proficiency and growth in reading and math, and are set to go into effect in the upcoming 2019-2020 school year.
 
The first school report card is required by law to head home to parents this September!
 
The Michigan Department of Education is required by law to develop by August 1 the system for assigning and delivering the grades. That’s just weeks away, but the Department is dragging its feet. The law says parents should expect their school’s grades in September, but without urgent action in Lansing, parents may not see them.
 
Parents and reformers across Michigan are demanding the Department comply with state law, and provide parents with the transparency they deserve.  As lawmakers work through the summer, we’re encouraging them to hold the Department accountable, as well.
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Our students bring home report cards each year so parents can monitor their progress.  Parents deserve the same level of transparency and accountability from their children’s schools.  Unfortunately, some schools are failing our students in reading and math, but empowering parents with more information will drive improvement across the state.  Parents deserve transparency.  They deserve A-F school report cards.
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Contact your lawmaker today and ask them to hold the Michigan Department of Education accountable, and to ensure parents receive report cards this September!

 

 

Tell lawmakers: Parents deserve A-F school report cards.  Ensure the Department of Education complies with state law and provides parents with school performance transparency!


Parents are counting on A-F School Grades, state must deliver

This column originally appeared in the Midland Daily News.

While lawmakers wrap up their summers, they and their staffs are constructing the reforms and priorities that will dominate their discussions once they return to Lansing.

Ensuring parents get report cards from their kids’ schools — a school transparency requirement under the state’s critical new A-F grading system for schools — should top their list. Lawmakers’ action is needed, because the state’s Department of Education is only days away from violating state law and abdicating its requirements for accountability to families.

Last winter, the Legislature approved critical reforms that would empower students, families and teachers by giving every public school in the state letter grades — A, B, C, D or F — in five key areas. The grades are to be based around student proficiency and growth in reading and math, and are set to go into effect in the upcoming 2019-2020 school year.

The first school report card is required by law to head home to parents just over a month from now.

Our students bring home report cards each year so parents can monitor their progress. Families deserve the same level of transparency and accountability from their children’s schools. Unfortunately, many of our schools are failing our students in critical subject areas like reading and math, but empowering parents with more information will drive improvement across the state. Where schools are succeeding, they deserve the credit.

That’s why lawmakers last December approved a new reform to hold the state’s schools as accountable to parents as our schools hold students for their work.

It’s an innovative approach to school accountability, and it’s designed to foster transparency and spur local growth. Parents count on our schools to prepare their kids for college, careers, and a brighter future. They also pay for the privilege, pumping thousands of dollars per pupil each year into our public schools.

Families deserve to know how their schools are performing.

The truth is, we’ve all got our work cut out for us. According to the National Assessment for Education Progress, Michigan ranks 35th in the nation on fourth-grade reading and 38th on 4th grade math. The numbers aren’t much better in 8th grade, where the state ranks 33rd in math and 30th in reading. Michigan is last among Midwest states in every category. Improvement can only begin with an understanding of how each school performs for our kids.

It is important to understand that this isn’t just a problem in our urban or economically disadvantaged communities. This is a problem across Michigan, including our “good” suburban school districts. Parents deserve the truth about school performance and with that information can demand better results for their students.

Each year, the state has pumped millions more into the school aid fund. USA Today recently ranked Michigan as one of the top states in America to teach, with public school teachers the 9th highest paid in the nation.

That investment is great, and more may be needed, but parents deserve to know what it’s producing. School report cards are a critical new transparency tool to empower parents and spur growth, but now at the eleventh hour, the Michigan Department of Education is standing in the way.

The Department is required by law to develop the system for assigning and delivering the grades by Aug. 1, a month ahead of their due date to parents. That deadline is only days away, and thus far, the Department has dragged its feet. Without quick action, parents will be kept in the dark.

Parents and reformers across Michigan are demanding the Department comply with state law, and provide parents with the transparency they deserve. As lawmakers work through the summer, we’re encouraging them to hold the Department accountable, as well.

Beth DeShone is the executive director of the Great Lakes Education Project

Appalling: State Board of Education Blocks $47 Million Obama-Era Grant for Public School Text Books, Classroom Equipment, School Programs

Board Votes to Block Funds Already Secured by Michigan Department of Ed, Approved by State Lawmakers

LANSING—In an appalling attack on Michigan teachers and their students, the Michigan State Board of Education last week voted to block a $47-plus million federal grant for Michigan public schools designed to provide new text books, classroom equipment and supplies, curriculum materials, and program design in many Michigan public schools.

The new five-year grant, which would pump $14 million worth of supplies, books, and programming into Michigan public charter school classrooms for the first school year alone, is part of an Obama-era grant under the Every Student Succeeds Act, and was secured last year by the Michigan Department of Education.

The State Board of Education blocked the grant after learning the funds were designed under former President Barack Obama to provide supplies specifically to public charter schools to expand opportunities for all students, particularly traditionally underserved students, to meet challenging state academic standards.

Public charter schools are one-hundred percent tuition free Michigan public schools, are open to every student, and are led in every classroom by highly qualified, state certified public school teachers.

“The Board of Education’s callous decision to block federal funds for text books and classroom supplies for many of the Michigan public school students who need them most is an attack on students, an attack on parents, and an attack on Michigan public school teachers,” said Beth DeShone Executive Director of the Great Lakes Education Project.  “The Board is holding public school teachers and their classrooms hostage because they dislike an Obama-era grant designed to help underserved public school students.  They should be ashamed, they should reverse course immediately, and they should stop standing between public school teachers and millions of dollars’ worth of text books and classroom supplies.”

For more information about the $47,222,222 public school grant from the U.S. Department of Education being brazenly blocked by the Michigan State Board of Education, please visit Michigan.gov.

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Governor Whitmer will fail students

Elimination of the state’s early literacy law will be a detriment to Michigan students

LANSING, MI – The Great Lakes Education Project Advocacy Director Beth DeShone today issued the following statement on Governor Whitmer’s call to eliminate the state’s 3rd grade reading law.

“Michigan’s Third Grade Reading law is an evidence-based policy that lifts Michigan’s students up to thrive. We owe it our children to give them the best and this starts with the skill of reading. Period. Governor Whitmer’s plan to eliminate reading intervention services for the students in Michigan who need them most is a slap in the face of Michigan children and their teachers. Instead of cutting support services that exist to help young students read, the Governor should demand the Michigan Department of Education work with local districts to ensure all aspects of the law are being followed – screenings, interventions, parental notification, individualized reading plans and, in the most difficult situations, possible retention in a different classroom. Studies prove students must learn to read by third grade so they can read to learn for the rest of their career. We cannot return to social promotion so that career politicians can coddle those who prioritize adult feelings over student needs.”

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GLEP Endorses in 70 Races for 2018 House and Senate Districts

Leading education advocacy group makes campaign endorsements

Lansing, MI – The Great Lakes Education Project (GLEP) today announced endorsements for candidates in 70 races for the Michigan House of Representatives and Michigan Senate in 2018. This includes 34 incumbent endorsements.

“GLEP is pleased to support these champions for students.  It is not easy to run for public office and buck the status quo, but these candidates have shown that they will ensure the first priority in education is each individual Michigan student.  I look forward to working with each of them in the future,” said Beth DeShone, GLEP Advocacy Director.   Candidates and incumbents endorsed today by GLEP include the following:

Senate

  • District #2: Adam Hollier (Detroit)
  • District #7: Representative Laura Cox (Livonia)
  • District #8: Representative Peter Lucido (Shelby Twp.)
  • District #10: Mike MacDonald (Macomb)
  • District #12: Representative Jim Tedder (Clarkston)
  • District #15: Representative Jim Runestad (White Lake)
  • District #16: Senator Mike Shirkey (Clarklake)
  • District #19: Representative John Bizon (Battle Creek)
  • District #21: Representative Kim LaSata (St. Joseph)
  • District #22: Representative Lana Theis (Brighton)
  • District #24: Representative Tom Barrett (Charlotte)
  • District #25: Representative Dan Lauwers (Brockway)
  • District #28: Senator Peter MacGregor (Rockford)
  • District #29: Representative Chris Afendoulis (Grand Rapids)
  • District #30: Representative Daniela Garcia (Holland)
  • District #33: (Former Representative) Rick Outman (Six Lakes)
  • District #34: Representative Holly Hughes (Montague)
  • District #36: Senator Jim Stamas (Midland)
  • District #37: Senator Wayne Schmidt (Traverse City)
  • District #38: Mike Carey (Crystal Falls)

House

  • District #2: Willie Bell (Detroit)
  • District #3: John Cromer (Detroit)
  • District #17: Representative Joe Bellino (Monroe)
  • District #20: Representative Jeff Noble (Plymouth)
  • District #21: Darian Moore (Canton)
  • District #30: Representative Diana Farrington (Utica)
  • District #32: Representative Pamela Hornberger (Chesterfield Township)
  • District #36: Karen Potchynok-Lund (Shelby Twp.)
  • District #38: Representative Kathy Crawford (Novi)
  • District #41: Doug Tietz (Troy)
  • District #42: Ann Bollin (Brighton)
  • District #43: Andrea Schroeder (Clarkston)
  • District #45: Representative Michael Webber (Rochester Hills)
  • District #47: Representative Hank Vaupel (Fowlerville)
  • District #51: Mike Mueller (Linden)
  • District #52: Teri Aiuto (Chelsea)
  • District #56: Representative Jason Sheppard (Lambertville)
  • District #57: Representative Bronna Kahle (Adrian)
  • District #58: Representative Eric Leutheuser (Hillsdale)
  • District #61: Representative Brandt Iden (Kalamazoo)
  • District #62: Dave Morgan (Battle Creek)
  • District #64: Representative Julie Alexander (Hanover)
  • District #65: Sarah Lightner (Springport)
  • District #66: Representative Beth Griffin (Mattawan)
  • District #67: Leon Clark (Mason)
  • District #70: Representative James Lower (Cedar Lake)
  • District #73: Lynn Afendoulis (Grand Rapids)
  • District #74: Mark Huizenga (Walker)
  • District #77: Representative Tommy Brann (Wyoming)
  • District #78: Brad Paquette (Niles)
  • District #80: Representative Mary Whiteford (South Haven)
  • District #81: Kenneth Nicholl (Yale)
  • District #85: Representative Ben Frederick (Owosso)
  • District #86: Representative Thomas Albert (Lowell)
  • District #87: Representative Julie Calley (Portland)
  • District #89: Representative Jim Lilly (Park Township)
  • District #91: Greg VanWoerkom (Norton Shores)
  • District #94: Steven Gerhardt (Saginaw)
  • District #97: Representative Jason Wentworth (Evart)
  • District #98: Annette Glenn (Auburn)
  • District #99: Representative Roger Hauck (Mt. Pleasant)
  • District #100: Representative Scott VanSingel (Grant)
  • District #101: Jack O’Malley (Lake Ann)
  • District #102: Representative Michele Hoitenga (Manton)
  • District #103: Representative Daire Rendon (Lake City)
  • District #104: Representative Larry Inman (Williamsburg)
  • District #105: Representative Triston Cole (Mancelona)
  • District #106: Representative Sue Allor (Wolverine)
  • District #107: Representative Lee Chatfield (Levering)
  • District #108: Representative Beau LaFave (Iron Mountain)

“As GLEP Chairman, I have witnessed the positive impact of education policy that supports the unique learning needs of each individual student.  These endorsed candidates are examples of thought leaders that will promote a continued focus on student centered educational opportunities,” said Jim Barrett, GLEP Chairman.

GLEP’s endorsement process includes past voting records, personal interviews and results from a candidate survey. Priority issues for GLEP include school choice, accountability and early literacy, while endorsed candidates may hold various positions on K-12 funding, curriculum standards, assessments, etc.